Yiddish Radio Project
Skip Nav

home EXHIBITS about gems store funding



Exhibit Map
The Jewish Philosopher
1 C. Israel Lutsky, the Jewish Philosopher
2 The Philosopher's Magazine and League
3 Lutsky on Carnation Milk
NPR Documentary
The Jewish Philosopher, the documentary about the first advice-giver of the air. (RealAudio, 12:14 min.)  


EXPLORE
PHOTOS
Images from the Jewish Philosopher's Magazine and League.  

READING
Selected articles from the Philosopher's magazine:

"The Aim and Purpose of the Philosopher's League"

"C. Israel Lutsky, a Biographical Sketch"

"Bulletin of Recent Events"

"An Open Letter to Advertisers"

 

EPHEMERA
Lutsky letter suggests controversy in the League.

Love letter: a league member's unrequited love.
 


The Philosopher's Magazine and League

In 1937, in a bid to capitalize on the success of his radio show and his growing stature among listeners, C. Israel Lutsky launched the Jewish Philosopher's League, Incorporated, "an organization that is truly a Cultural and Spiritual Cult," and The Jewish Philosopher magazine, its house organ. Promising "a successful challenge to loneliness of the heart … loneliness of the soul … loneliness of the spirit," the league was in essence a matchmaking service built around the magnetic personality of its leader.

Having paid the $10 initiation fee and $5 annual dues, league members could attend sponsored activities like dances, amateur drama classes, and boat rides. If the balance sheet totted up positive for Lutsky, no tally exists on aching hearts salved by the venture. Evidence does however exist that at least one heart was broken: by the Jewish Philosopher's League treasurer, Morris Shimshak (see letter). (A little while later, Shimshak found himself on the outs, following a squabble with Lutsky about matters financial.)

Endorsements of the league were dutifully penned into every Jewish Philosopher article, written by members of the league's executive committee. True to its mission, The Jewish Philosopher ran a biographical sketch of Lutsky, an open letter from Lutsky to his listeners, and a novelette based on the solution of a letter writer's woes. The first issue, dated November 1937, was also the last.

Next Page: Lutsky on Carnation Milk »

 

Copyright 2002 Sound Portraits Productions. All rights reserved.